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Edgar Frolov
Edgar Frolov

Buy Galaxy Note Edge [PORTABLE]


The Galaxy Note Edge ships with Android 4.4.4 "KitKat" and Samsung's TouchWiz interface and software suite, and is similar to that of the Note 4. The curved edge of the screen is used as a sidebar for various purposes: it can be used to display different panels, including shortcuts to frequent applications, displays of notifications, news, stocks, sports, social networks, playback controls for the music and video players, camera controls, data usage, and minigames. Tools are also available through the panel, including a ruler, stopwatch, timer, voice recorder, and flashlight button. A software development kit is available for developers to code panels; additional panels can be obtained through Galaxy Apps. The "Night Clock" mode allows the edge screen to, during a pre-determined timeframe, display a digital clock while not in use. Due to the nature of AMOLED displays, which render black by not turning on the pixel at all, this mode does not significantly consume battery power, but per software limitations it cannot be active for more than 12 hours at a time.[6][8][10]




buy galaxy note edge


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The camera is improved, the S Pen is starting to show glimmers of offering really useful functionality to the average consumer (not just the business warrior hell-bent on dropping the notepad) and the raw power of the Snapdragon 805 chipset (or the octacore Exynos option from Samsung) means this phablet can go on, and on, and on.


John joined TechRadar over a decade ago as Staff Writer for Phones, and over the years has built up a vast knowledge of the tech industry. He's interviewed CEOs from some of the world's biggest tech firms, visited their HQs and has appeared on live TV and radio, including Sky News, BBC News, BBC World News, Al Jazeera, LBC and BBC Radio 4. Originally specializing in phones, tablets and wearables, John is now TechRadar's resident automotive expert, reviewing the latest and greatest EVs and PHEVs on the market. John also looks after the day-to-day running of the site. "}; var triggerHydrate = function() window.sliceComponents.authorBio.hydrate(data, componentContainer); var triggerScriptLoadThenHydrate = function() if (window.sliceComponents.authorBio === undefined) var script = document.createElement('script'); script.src = ' -9-3/authorBio.js'; script.async = true; script.id = 'vanilla-slice-authorBio-component-script'; script.onload = () => window.sliceComponents.authorBio = authorBio; triggerHydrate(); ; document.head.append(script); else triggerHydrate(); if (window.lazyObserveElement) window.lazyObserveElement(componentContainer, triggerScriptLoadThenHydrate, 1500); else console.log('Could not lazy load slice JS for authorBio') } }).catch(err => console.log('Hydration Script has failed for authorBio Slice', err)); }).catch(err => console.log('Externals script failed to load', err));John McCannSocial Links NavigationGlobal Managing EditorJohn joined TechRadar over a decade ago as Staff Writer for Phones, and over the years has built up a vast knowledge of the tech industry. He's interviewed CEOs from some of the world's biggest tech firms, visited their HQs and has appeared on live TV and radio, including Sky News, BBC News, BBC World News, Al Jazeera, LBC and BBC Radio 4. Originally specializing in phones, tablets and wearables, John is now TechRadar's resident automotive expert, reviewing the latest and greatest EVs and PHEVs on the market. John also looks after the day-to-day running of the site.


On the one hand, Samsung's new Revolving UI and Edge display apps and widgets make the most of the curved portion of the screen, opening up new possibilities for interacting with your phone controls. On the other hand, it's really expensive and there's no actual need for the waterfall effect, other than to showcase its makers' ingenuity with material properties. And now, in the wake of an even bolder LG attempt at a screen with two curved edges, this original here is looking a little passe.


About that screen: it's made from one continuous piece of glass that tops the flexible (but fixed) AMOLED display beneath. Instead of having a straight right spine, the curve joins the back of the phone, creating a kind of pointy edge.


Samsung made brand-new software to fit the Edge's brand-new shape, and the company calls its interface the Revolving UI with good reason. It's best to think of it as a multifunctional home screen that you can swipe through to see various icons and widgets. Like a revolving door, you swipe your thumb toward the phone edge to advance, and to circle back to the beginning.


Now for the second benefit, one that's actually one of the phone's best "unique" features. After-hours, the date and time will dimly and persistently glow out at you from the Night Clock. This is an optional mode that lets you set the times you want it. In my case, from 11pm to 6am. And glow it does. With the Note Edge laying flat on its back and the edge turned toward you, it becomes as effective and far less obtrusive than other docked alarm clock setups, but is still bright enough to read.


Then I started to appreciate that I could read more of the message as it streamed down the side, and open it if I tapped the edge quickly enough. If not, swiping to the notification screen is another fast way to open the alert.


Earlier I talked about how lefties have to adjust with the curved screen on the right. Samsung rival LG used CES 2015 in Las Vegas to show off a display that uses two curved edges, apparently a concession for left-handed users.


Of course, the main draw with any Note device is the S-Pen stylus, that provides precision usage and note taking abilities, like easily clipping parts of the screen for later usage, access to the S Note, and the Action Memo. The S-Pen itself has also been enhanced to allow for an even finer writing experience. The S-Note application now comes with Photo Note, that captures the lines and designs of any scene, and makes them editable, which is great for making signs, blackboards, or any presentation open to your creativity. Everything said and done, while the S-Pen can prove to be an integral feature of the Galaxy Note Edge, it does feel somewhat weird, especially when you, literally, fall off the edge.


Pricing does prove to be an issue in the case of the Galaxy Note Edge, with the device on occasion costing $150 more than the Galaxy Note 4, which is essentially the same device, save for the edge. Whether that edge is enough to justify the difference in price is entirely up to you, but all said done, the overall experience is mostly the same with the comparatively cheaper Galaxy Note 4.


The 5.6-inch Quad HD Super AMOLED screen has a high resolution with more pixels, making the display sharper, brighter and more immersive than ever. The Galaxy Note Edge delivers unique smartphone experiences with a scrollable screen that wraps around the right edge of the device, extending the screen with room to do and see more. The Edge screen gives access to email, Internet, apps, notifications, news and more without interrupting the content on the main screen. Night clock mode dimly displays the time, alarm and weather and is easily viewable when the Galaxy Note Edge is placed bedside. Consumers can customize the scrollable Edge menu panel with their favorite apps for quick access; the apps are always available, from any screen.


How to best use the edge of the screen will be a learning experience for Samsung and for app makers. There's a fine line between information that's useful and that's simply distracting. A news ticker on the devices shown at IFA fell into the latter category, for example.


People today have become more intimate with our mobile devices. Samsung recreated the experience of writing in a notebook in order to continue human analogue behavior. Like the familiar experience delivered by the Edge Screen, Samsung will continue to create new levels of humanistic experience by combining analog interaction with digital experiences. For more stories about the design of Samsung products, visit Design Samsung website.


Following on the heels of the Galaxy Note 4, Samsung is also announcing a new product named the Galaxy Note Edge. In terms of basic hardware, not much changes. Same fingerprint sensor, same SoC, same RAM, camera, battery, etc. The one fundamental difference is that the display has a curved edge similar to the patent depictions. Samsung is pushing this as a secondary display of sorts that allows for more information to be shown along the curved edge without disrupting the rest of the content on the display. This is done by extending the display by an extra 160 pixels in width. I've included a spec sheet below to show the rest of the differences between the Note 4 and Note Edge.


In practice, the display doesn't really seem to have much area, and tapping shortcuts and other objects on the sidebar tends to require a bit more precision than what I'm used to. For the most part, the use cases are largely similar to what we saw in the Continuum as well. Live news feeds were one possible use case, along with Twitter feeds and Facebook status updates. The other uses that were available included placing camera controls on the curved area to make the viewfinder larger, notifications while watching movies, and some quick tools such as a flashlight or ruler. The curved edge can also serve as an alarm clock. Overall I found it hard to see any particular killer app, but it may be useful to some. To me, the Note Edge doesn't really seem better than the Note 4, just different.


The key thing to note is that, although physically the curved and flat parts of the display are all of a piece, the software behind it treats the two separately. The flat bit behaves just as you might expect it to on a standard smartphone, while the curved strip serves up notifications, hosts shortcuts and presents useful information on the side.


By default, a series of shortcuts line up along the edge screen, allowing you to tap to launch your favourites apps. When notifications come in, you see them peek around the edge of the phone. Swipe down and you can access a series of handy apps that run right in the edge screen: a ruler (yep, you read that right), a stopwatch and timer, plus a flashlight shortcut and voice recorder. 041b061a72


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